When building a business or residence, indoor environmental quality must be considered for the people who will live and work in the space.

Indoor environmental quality focuses design techniques on promoting better indoor air quality and access to daylight and views. This allows the humans who live and work in the environment to experience physical comfort so they can take care of business.  

Low Indoor Environmental Quality

High Indoor Environmental Quality

The indoor environmental quality will be determined by the lighting, windows and air temperature and flow.

Lighting:

In commercial buildings, more energy is used for lighting than for anything else. Designing exterior walls to include windows can greatly decrease the need for artificial lighting.

Low-Mercury Fluorescent Light Bulbs:

As a replacement of translucent bulbs. Combined with energy-efficient lighting design, the bulbs reduce the building’s average annual mercury waste by 600 milligrams.

Office Ceiling Lights:

These suspended fixtures project light up and down, allowing 90 percent of the light to be utilized (which is about 50 percent better than typical systems) with reduced glare.

 

The indoor environmental quality will be determined by the lighting, windows and air temperature and flow.

Lighting:

In commercial buildings, more energy is used for lighting than for anything else. Designing exterior walls to include windows can greatly decrease the need for artificial lighting.

Low-Mercury Fluorescent Light Bulbs:

As a replacement of translucent bulbs. Combined with energy-efficient lighting design, the bulbs reduce the building’s average annual mercury waste by 600 milligrams.

Office Ceiling Lights:

These suspended fixtures project light up and down, allowing 90 percent of the light to be utilized (which is about 50 percent better than typical systems) with reduced glare.

Rooftop Skylight:

Skylights can illuminate top floor rooms block heat flow, thus reducing energy needed for cooling or heating.

Windows:

Low-E glass windows allow visible light in—reducing the need for artificial lighting—but have a reflective coating to keep heat inside when it’s cool outside. This coating also prevents excess heat from overheating the interior when it’s warm outside. Both types of glass are supplied by most window manufacturers.

Cooling and Heating:

Efficiency can be achieved with the use of vegetation, windows, light-colored roofing, natural ventilation, operable windows in every office, and rooftop monitors using louvers and fans to draw warm air up and expel it outside. Installing more thermostat units the temperatures can be better monitored and regulated for smaller spaces.

Cooling units that utilize natural air and not ozone-depleting refrigerants are less expensive and do not pollute the air.

Ceiling Fans:

Adjustable, multispeed ceiling fans throughout the building aid natural ventilation. The fans blades are designed to mimic the aerodynamic performance of aircraft propellers to improve air movement downward.

Every aspect of a building, inside and out, should be considered for water conservation. Whether the water be from man made pipelines or from the sky we need to consider how we are using water.  This is why Water Conservation is a major point in LEED Certification.

 

Points for  Indoor Environmental Quality

  • Prereq 1 Minimum IAQ Performance
  • Prereq 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Required
  • Credit 1 Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring
  • Credit 2 Increased Ventilation
  • Credit 3.1 Construction IAQ Management Plan, During Construction
  • Credit 3.2 Construction IAQ Management Plan, Before Occupancy
  • Credit 4.1 Low-Emitting Materials, Adhesives & Sealants
  • Credit 4.2 Low-Emitting Materials, Paints & Coatings
  • Credit 4.3 Low-Emitting Materials, Flooring Systems
  • Credit 4.4 Low-Emitting Materials, Composite Wood & Agrifiber Products
  • Credit 5 Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control
  • Credit 6.1 Controllability of Systems, Lighting
  • Credit 6.2 Controllability of Systems, Thermal Comfort
  • Credit 7.1 Thermal Comfort, Design
  • Credit 7.2 Thermal Comfort, Verification
  • Credit 8.1 Daylight & Views, Daylight for 75% of Spaces
  • Credit 8.2 Daylight & Views, Views for 90% of Spaces

For more articles on specific LEED Categories click the links below.

LEED Categories Home

Sustainable Sites

Water Conservation

Energy & Atmosphere

Material and Resources

Indoor Environmental Quality (you are here)

Recent Posts
Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt

Start typing and press Enter to search